Posts Tagged ‘baby elephant’

SPECIAL OFFER: Save 50% on your “Eyes of Thailand” Screening when you book by July 31, 2013.

Tuesday, July 9th, 2013

You’ve probably heard of the “Summer of Love”. Well, we want 2013 to be known as the “Summer of ELE-Love”!

That’s why we’ve negotiated to offer THE EYES OF THAILAND Special Screenings at a 50% Discount if you book by July 31st.

The Eyes of Thailand DVDWe’re calling it THE EYES OF THAILAND “Summer of ELE-Love” Package, and if you book your screening by July 31st, you’ll lock in the Special Screening price of US $250.
Summer of ELE-Love” Screening PACKAGE: $250.00
A 50% Discount!!!
Your screening fee includes:

(1) THE EYES OF THAILAND Screener DVD

(1) Screening License for one Private Screening
(1) Online PR Kit, including: poster art, logo, trailer, press kit.
Facebook and/or Twitter posts from the filmmakers to help promote your screening.
You save 50%.
Your community gets inspired.
The filmmakers will donate 10% of the Screening Fee to FAE’s Elephant Hospital. 
It’s a Win-Win-Win scenario!
THE EYES OF THAILAND screening is perfect for schools, colleges, churches, synagogues, temples, yoga studios, businesses, organizations and community fundraisers.
And if you charge $10 per ticket, you start making a profit after only 25 people!
Book by July 31st.
Screen the film anytime before December 31st.
Ask about the Special Option to add a Post-Screening Skype or Facetime call with Director/Producer Windy Borman.
Offer expires July 31st, so don’t wait! 
Book your screening of THE EYES OF THAILAND by July 31st, to save 50% on the screening fee and start spreading the “ELE-Love” to your community.
We look forward to bringing the film elephants everywhere give “2 Trunks Up!” to a group, organization or school near you! Email us today!
Sincerely,
Windy, Tim and “The Eyes of Thailand” Team

A Healing Touch for FAE’s Elephants

Thursday, March 7th, 2013

Patty Coggan, Soraida Salwala and Anne Snowball at FAE's Elephant Hospital. (c) Eyes of Thailand, LLC.

We had the honor of traveling to FAE’s Elephant Hospital with practioners of TTOUCH™ and Craniosacral Therapy in 2010 and 2012. Below is a conversation with two of them, Anne Snowball and Patty Coggan, about their work on FAE’s elephants, including Mosha, Motala and Boonmee, who are featured in “The Eyes of Thailand” now available on DVD.

What is TTOUCH? What types of animals was it designed for?

Anne Snowball: TTOUCH™ is part of the Tellington Method which aids in rebalancing both animal and human mentally, emotionally, and physically.  The method incorporates the TTOUCH™ body work and ground exercises to build confidence, overcome negative behavior patterns, and release pain and fear.  It differs from massage as it works with the nervous system and the body at the cellular level.  Further, TTOUCH™ involves gentle, non-habitual, movements of the skin bringing sensory awareness and trust. Originally developed for horses, its universality has expanded into companion animal and wildlife rescue communities.

How did you hear about the elephant landmine survivors at FAE?

Anne: I was volunteering at a major wildlife symposium focusing on endangered African species when Director/Producer Windy Borman approached me and posed the question of the plight of the Asian elephant.   During our conversation, I was fascinated by the work that she was doing with the Asian elephant in Thailand and immediately realized this was an ideal place to apply TTOUCH™ .

Patty Coggan:  I was part of the team that Anne put together to go to Thailand and work on the elephants and teach the mahouts techniques that would help the elephants heal.  [Anne and I] had met in an advanced training of craniosacral therapy for equines.  Anne and I work together on large animals combining both TTOUCH™ and Craniosacral Therapy.  The synergy of both methods has proven to be very effective.

Why did you think TTOUCH™ and Craniosacral Therapy might help Mosha, Motala and Boonme at FAE?

Patty:  The technique gives the caregivers another tool to use to help the healing.

Anne: These three elephants had not only been traumatized physically by the loss of a limb, but some had also lost their mother and been deserted by their mahouts (owner/care giver).   Utilizing TTOUCH™ in the daily care of these gentle giants would help restore the quality of life they deserved.

What did Soraida Salwala (FAE’s Founder) think about the idea?

Anne: She was quite skeptical, but curious!!!

What it was like seeing the elephants for the first time? 

Anne: I was overwhelmed with grief and sadness for the atrocities these elephants had endured.  I also was so inspired by their incredibly intrepid spirit and their serene nature!  I remember taking a deep breath realizing what potential TTOUCH™ could bring to FAE.

Patty:  The spirit of the hospital was at first sight very professional.  As I stayed there longer and observed, I saw and felt the tremendous healing going on there.  The wound to Boonmee, who was our primary elephant Soraida asked us to work with, was frightening.  Poor thing had given up on living and Soraida was very concerned.

Anne Snowball (left) and Patty Coggan give elephant landmine survivor Boonmee healing touches in 2010. (c) Eyes of Thailand, LLC.

Anne: We approached her waiting to see if she would acknowledge our presence by raising her trunk in greeting.  When she remained motionless we cautiously raised our hands to her forehead, palm side down, lifting the skin toward the top of her head in very tiny movements and waited for her response – within 2 minutes our hands were suddenly thrust up in the air.  Then she lifted her head with an acquisitive eye as if to say, “What just happened?” Then she started slowly swinging her trunk.   That afternoon we returned to see her eagerly eating bananas and bamboo shoots, and her caregiver was all smiles!

Patty: As we worked with Boonmee and released the trauma, she became herself again…. a bit feisty and willing to eat again.  Animals are willing to give up trauma and are not as attached to it as humans are. After Boonmee trusted us—trust found through the work we did with her—she let go of so much and the light in her eyes returned.

Anne: Mosha, the youngster, grew to enjoy our hands, as well, whether it was feathering the strands of hair at the end of her tail, relieving pain with TTOUCH lifts on her hind end, or doing mouth work with touches all over her tongue and roof of her mouth. Almost always she would greet us with her trunk raised in greeting.

Motala was the grand matriarch and oldest of landmine patients at FAE. She was gracious each time we stopped to work with her, remaining at the edge of her enclosure to take full advantage of what we could do for her.  Her mahout was always at her side, eagerly waiting to follow our hands with his in unison as we worked her entire trunk.  Her skin was so rough I thought, how can she feel us?  But her alert eyes would soften within minutes.

Motala, the matriarch at FAE's Elephant Hospital, presents her injured leg for TTouch and Craniosacral work in 2010. (c) Eyes of Thailand, LLC.

You performed TTOUCH™ and Craniosacral Therapy on Mosha, Motala and Boonmee in 2010 and 2012. What had changed for the elephants in those 2 years? 

Anne: We returned to FAE in 2012 to a very warm welcome by the staff and Soraida.

Patty:  I had always heard about elephants remembering.  I was very eager to see if it was true.

Anne: Our joy in seeing Motala, Moshe, and Boonmee was uncontainable!  Motala remained just that much older and wiser in our presence.  Mosha also had matured but did not forget TTOUCH™– only this time she softly purred in response to hair slides to each bristly hair growing over her forehead!

Patty: Mosha was happy to see us and didn’t purr so we could hear it, but vibrated her whole body in greeting as we worked on her.  I had a feeling that she was letting all the elephants there know that we were there again.  She is such a loving animal!

Anne: But Boonmee was the most compelling! In our greeting she raised her trunk, which I cupped in my hands and softly I exhaled into her trunk.   Her trunk then almost caressed my shoulder and chest.

Patty: As soon as we rushed to see Boonmee, I knew she remembered us.  She turned as we approached, her eyes bright.  As we touched her, she caressed us with her trunk…. yes, she remembered.  And as we touched her face she purred, happily greeting us and telling us she was glad we were once again with her.

Elephant landmine survivor Boonmee reunites with Patty Coggan (front) and Anne Snowball in 2012. (c) Eyes of Thailand, LLC.

Anne: Two years had passed in which her recovery had been problematic and frustrating.  She had not been able to fully accept normal weight on her bad foot.   The second day she allowed me complete access to her injured leg and foot.  I worked from her shoulder to her knee with circles and lifts, which she encouraged me to continue far longer than I had expected by leaning gently into my hands with each touch.   On the third day as we walked up to see her, her trunk was arched high, and she was completely weighted on her injured leg.   These were the kind of results we had only hoped for but surely did not expect to observe.

Patty: She was more trusting to let us work with her and completely “let us in”, so we could work core to core.

Anne: Both staff and Soraida were exuberant as well over her sudden progress.

What changes did you see in the elephants after their TTOUCH™ sessions?

Anne: They had soft, contented eyes, robust appetites, and wonderful greetings the following day with trunks lifted high.

While at FAE’s Elephant Hospital, you shared your TTOUCH™ and Craniosacral Therapy experience with Soraida and the staff. What was it like teaching them?

Anne: Encouraged by Soraida, the staff was open and receptive in spite of the language and cultural differences.  They were particularly observant of their elephant’s reaction to us when we demonstrated ear work, circle touches on the shoulder area, and lifts on their legs – each touch designed to relieve the stress and tension.  They enjoyed following our hands as we traveled over their bodies.  Touching the mahouts was culturally prohibited but they finally allowed us to perform the touch on their forearms to understand the pressure and technique.  We also placed our hands as guides over their hands when in contact with the elephants.  A smile, grin, or giggle amongst themselves acknowledged their growing enthusiasm in learning this new tool.

Anne Snowball (right) walks with elephant landmine survivor Mosha as her mahout watches. (c) Eyes of Thailand, LLC.

Patty:  I worked with Dr. Kay and she seemed very interested in the work, as well.  I remember feeling a sense of gratitude that even a medical Dr. was open to learning new techniques.  It was a cultural adventure to teach someone, who did not speak the same verbal language, but appreciated the language of touch.

You also treated Ekhe in the fall of 2012.  How did you treat her?  Do you think it helped her passing?

Patty:  By the time we worked with Ekhe, she was very ill.  She had an infection that had spread to her central nervous system.  The first day she was quite agitated. We kept our distance that day and worked on her from afar.  The next day was teaching the mahouts the TTOUCH™.  She had calmed down by then as they worked with her.  She seemed to respond well.   At one point I was able to work with her head….at times there were moments when she could focus on what was going on.  We assured her we were there to help her and support her no matter her decision.

Anne: Elephants have big families.  I felt I had been adopted into hers as I showed her mahout the lift TTOUCH™ that provided the comfort and support during her passing,   Small light touches were performed visualizing her perfection.

Was there any moment or experience from either trip that was especially memorable?

Anne: The whole experience was frankly one of the most exciting experiences in my life.  I would never be able to focus on any particular moment that was especially outstanding, but if I were forced to choose I would have to say the connection made with Boonmee was remarkable. Feeling her come back and be present was an honor and the way she recognized Patty and me on our return.   The end of her trunk nestled in our hands and caressed our shoulders for several minutes in welcoming us back to FAE.

Patty:  On our last visit, we told her verbally, that if she wanted to go down with the other elephants (and not stay in the rehab unit) she would have to walk and put weight on her front leg.  Two days later Sorida posted on Facebook that she had walked “ like a normal elephant”.  No surprise to us.

To learn more about Anne Snowball and her TTOUCH™ work, please visit: www.callingallanimals.com

To connect with Patty Coggan and her Craniosacral work, join her on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/patty.coggan

‘The Eyes of Thailand” Now Available on DVD

Wednesday, February 27th, 2013

The Eyes of Thailand DVDD.V.A. Productions, in Association with Indiewood Pictures, is proud to announce the nationwide DVD release of “The Eyes of Thailand”. FilmWorks Entertainment distributes the film and DVD orders can be placed at http://eyesofthailand.com.

“The Eyes of Thailand” is directed/produced by Windy Borman and produced by Tim VandeSteeg. The 10-time award-winning documentary, narrated by Ashley Judd, tells the heartwarming and heroic true story of Soraida Salwala, a passionate woman who dedicated 10 years of her life to help two Asian elephants walk again after losing their legs from stepping on landmines.

“The Eyes of Thailand” was awarded the “ACE Documentary Film Grant” from The Humane Society of the United States, the “Best Documentary” Jury Award from the Big Bear Lake International Film Festival, and “Best Documentary” Audience Award from Flickers: Rhode Island International Film Festival. Salwala received the “Best Heroine in a Wildlife Film” Award at the International Wildlife Film Festival and was nominated for the “People and Nature” Panda Award at the Wildscreen Festival. The film has also garnered Humanitarian, Green, Animal Advocacy and Animation awards since its film festival premiere in April 2012.

The elephant stars of the film have been capturing the hearts of people worldwide and were featured in National Geographic, Yahoo, Takepart.com, Huffington Post and IndieWire.

You can order your DVD today by clicking here.

‘THE EYES OF THAILAND’ BRINGS ELEPHANT LANDMINE SURVIVOR STORY TO DVD

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

PRESS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Contact Name:  Windy Borman

Phone: (415) 317-5697

Email: windy@dvaproductions.com

 

‘THE EYES OF THAILAND’ BRINGS ELEPHANT LANDMINE SURVIVOR STORY TO DVD

Ashley Judd narrates the 10-time award-winning film out February 26, 2013.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA (February 5, 2013) – D.V.A. Productions, in Association with Indiewood Pictures, is proud to announce the nationwide DVD release of “The Eyes of Thailand” on February 26, 2013. FilmWorks Entertainment distributes the film and DVD orders can be placed at http://eyesofthailand.com.

“The Eyes of Thailand” is directed/produced by Windy Borman and produced by Tim VandeSteeg. The 10-time award-winning documentary, narrated by Ashley Judd, tells the heartwarming and heroic true story of Soraida Salwala, a passionate woman who dedicated 10 years of her life to help two Asian elephants walk again after losing their legs from stepping on landmines.

Judd writes, “The Eyes of Thailand is a story of sacrifice and perseverance that shows how far one woman will go to save an endangered species from threats above and below the surface. I hope it will raise awareness to protect Asian Elephants—and all beings—from the terror of landmines.”

Borman began following the story after meeting Soraida, Mosha and Motala in Thailand and seeing their journey from landmine victims to survivors.  “Witnessing Mosha and Motala take their first steps on their new prostheses was one of the most amazing moments of my life. I cannot wait to share it with the world.” said Borman. 

“The Eyes of Thailand” was awarded the “ACE Documentary Film Grant” from The Humane Society of the United States, the “Best Documentary” Jury Award from the Big Bear Lake International Film Festival, and “Best Documentary” Audience Award from Flickers: Rhode Island International Film Festival. Salwala received the “Best Heroine in a Wildlife Film” Award at the International Wildlife Film Festival and was nominated for the “People and Nature” Panda Award at the Wildscreen Festival. The film has also garnered Humanitarian, Green, Animal Advocacy and Animation awards since its film festival premiere in April 2012.

The elephant stars of the film have been capturing the hearts of people worldwide and were featured in National Geographic, Yahoo, Takepart.com, Huffington Post and IndieWire.

The filmmakers have created a successful and loyal following through the film’s social media sites, including Facebook <www.facebook.com/eyesofthailand> and Twitter <www.twitter.com/eyesofthailand>, and the film’s website <www.eyesofthailand.com>.

FilmWorks Entertainment is an independent film, television, and specialty program Distribution Company located in Santa Clarita, California.  Established by film makers for film makers FilmWorks acquires, produces and releases programming worldwide across all platforms. For more information about FilmWorks Entertainment, please visit www.filmworksent.com

For further inquiries, please contact: Windy Borman windy@dvaproductions.com

 

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THREE-LEGGED ELEPHANTS IN “THE EYES OF THAILAND” TO HAVE THEIR MINNESOTA PREMIERE AT THE TWIN CITIES FILM FEST

Thursday, October 4th, 2012

PRESS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Contact Name:  Tim VandeSteeg

Phone: (310) 497-4495

Email: tim@indiewood.net

 

THREE-LEGGED ELEPHANTS IN “THE EYES OF THAILAND” TO HAVE THEIR MINNESOTA PREMIERE AT THE TWIN CITIES FILM FEST

Ashley Judd narrates the eight-time award-winning documentary “The Eyes of Thailand” about one woman’s quest to help two elephant landmine survivors walk again on prostheses.

LOS ANGELES, CA – (October 4, 2012) – D.V.A. Productions, in Association with Indiewood Pictures, is proud to announce the Minnesota Premiere of the 8-time award-winning and critically acclaimed documentary The Eyes of Thailand, narrated by Ashley Judd.

The Film will Premiere at Twin Cities Film Festival on Saturday, October 13, 2012 at 5:30pm at the Showplace ICON Theater (1625 West End Boulevard St. Louis Park, MN 5541). The Film is Directed/Produced by Windy Borman and Produced by Tim VandeSteeg, a Minnesota native and Special Guest for the Minnesota Premiere.

Tickets are available now at <http://www.twincitiesfilmfest.org/>.

After losing their legs from stepping on a landmine, two elephant survivors are given a second chance to walk again in this powerful and heartwarming story of sacrifice and perseverance.  “There are documentaries that make you think, those that make you feel, and then those like ‘Eyes of Thailand,’ that leave you shaken, inspired and unable to see the world the same ever again. We couldn’t be more honored to celebrate a film like this – one of vision, passion and heart. It is cinema at its most electrifying”, said Steve Snyder, Artistic Director at Twin Cities Film Fest.

The Eyes of Thailand is a story of sacrifice and perseverance that shows how far one woman will go to save an endangered species from threats above and below the surface. I hope it will raise awareness to protect Asian Elephants—and all beings—from the terror of landmines,” said Ashley Judd.

“The Eyes of Thailand” was awarded the “ACE Documentary Film Grant” from The Humane Society of the United States. Jonny Vasic, Director of the ACE program says, “The Eyes of Thailand is an inspiring and unique documentary that will open up hearts and minds about the amazing veterinary work being performed at the Asian Elephant hospital.”

The film received the “Best Documentary” Jury Award at the Big Bear Lake International Film Festival and Soraida Salwala received the “Best Herione in a Wildlife Film” Award at the International Wildlife Film Festival. The film has also garnered Humanitarian, Green, Animal Advocacy and Animation awards since its World Premiere in April 2012 at the Newport Beach Film Festival.

The elephant stars of the film have been capturing the hearts of people worldwide and were featured in National Geographic, Takepart.com, Yahoo, Huffington Post and IndieWire.

“When I met Soraida, Mosha and Motala in 2007, I knew I discovered an untold story that I needed to share with the world.  Witnessing Mosha and Motala take their first steps on their new prostheses was one of the most amazing moments of my life. I cannot wait to share it with the world,” said Director/Producer Windy Borman.

“The Eyes of Thailand” is a story that embodies heart, courage and compassion to make a real difference and improve the lives of others, no matter whatever obstacles stand in your way,” said producer Tim VandeSteeg.

The filmmakers have created a successful and loyal following through the film’s social media sites, including Facebook <www.facebook.com/eyesofthailand> and Twitter <www.twitter.com/eyesofthailand>, and the film’s website <www.eyesofthailand.com>.

For further inquiries, please contact: Tim VandeSteeg tim@indiewood.com

East Coast Premiere of “The Eyes of Thailand”

Saturday, July 28th, 2012

Soriada Salwala’s love for elephant began early. When she was 8-years old, she saw an injured elephant lying helplessly on the side of the road. As her family drove past, they hear a gunshot. Her father explained, “Uncle Elephant is in heaven now”. “But if he was dying,” asked young Soraida, “why couldn’t he go to the hospital?” Flash forward several years and Soraida opened the World’s First Elephant Hospital to treat ill and injured elephants.

To date Soraida and her staff have treated over 3,500 Asian elephants for everything from eye infections, knife wounds, gunshot wounds and broken bones. However, their biggest challenge came in 1999 when an elephant landmine survivor, named Motala, arrived at FAE’s Elephant Hospital. Seven years later, a 7-month old calf named Mosha, arrived after she stepped on a landmine.

Soraida’s amazing 10-year journey to help these two elephant landmine survivors walk again on prostheses is chronicled in the award-winning, inspirational documentary, The Eyes of Thailand, narrated by Ashley Judd. The film is directed/produced by Windy Borman and produced by Tim VandeSteeg.

“The Eyes of Thailand” will have its East Coast Premiere at Flickers: Rhode Island International Film Festival on August 12, 2012 at 12:00pm. Coincidentally, August 12th is the inaugural World Elephant Day.

Purchase tickets via: http://tinyurl.com/eotRIIFF

Invite your FaceBook friends to the event: http://www.facebook.com/events/379676615421360/

You can also find information and keep track of the film’s progress via the website, FaceBook and Twitter.

“The Eyes of Thailand” announces More Film Festival screenings

Tuesday, June 26th, 2012

Dearest “Ele-Friends”,

We are thrilled to announce that “The Eyes of Thailand” film has been accepted into four more film festivals.

Narrated by Ashley Judd, “The Eyes of Thailand” tells the true and inspirational story of one woman’s quest to help two elephant landmine survivors–Motala and Baby Mosha–walk again on their own four legs. Treating their wounds was only part of the journey; building elephant-sized prostheses was another.

“The Eyes of Thailand” continues its film festival screenings at the following festivals this summer and fall:

The Las Vegas International Film Festival

July 20, 2012 at 4:45pm at LVH Theatre

FLICKERS: Rhode Island International Film Festival

August 7-12, 2012

Port Townsend Film Festival

September 21-23, 2012

Wildscreen Festival

October 14-19, 2012

We are thrilled to announce that not only will Wildscreen be the U.K. Premiere for “The Eyes of Thailand”, but we are also one of only three (3) films nominated for a Panda Award in the “People and Nature” category.

Please mark your calendars and spread the word, as we would love to have as many “Ele-Friends” in the audience as possible to spread awareness about the plight of the Asian Elephant and the on-going threat of landmines. Krup kum ka!

-Windy Borman

Director/Producer, “The Eyes of Thailand”

An Open Letter to the Elephant Community

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

Dear “Ele-Friends”,

We received a public tweet from a fellow elephant lover today that I felt deserved a public response. I have replied to her directly, but I think it’s a worthy conversation for the Elephant Community at large, so I have posted it here as an open letter. We look forward to hearing your comments and if you can join us at the Little Rock Film Festival on either May 30th or June 1st, please give us an “Ele-Friend” shout out.

——————————————————-

Hi, Cora,

I saw your tweet and I just want to clarify that the Little Rock Film Festival selected “The Eyes of Thailand” and they worked with the Little Rock Zoo to host one of two screenings of “The Eyes of Thailand” during the festival.

As a filmmaker, one of my jobs is to ensure that the film reaches the broadest audience possible. Hence, this is why we have submitted to several film festivals around the United States and the world. Once they select us, they decide our screening locations and times, and if they want to partner with sponsors or partners for screenings.

I personally know that the zoos vs. sanctuaries debate is ripe with “elephant politics”, enough to fill several Elephant Summits, however one of the mission’s of the “The Eyes of Thailand” film is to start the much needed conversations about protecting Asian elephants in their native countries. This, of course, spills over into how Asian elephants are treated in their non-native countries, but that is a secondary conversation because the film is neither pro-zoo or anti-zoo. It is pro-Thai Asian Elephants and pro-FAE’s Elephant Hospital.

On a side note, as activists, I think it is dangerous if we only speak to the people that are already on our side because we won’t make very much progress that way. I believe we need to speak with the unenlightened and the neutral people, too, if we want to make real, significant changes.

At the end of the day, though, “The Eyes of Thailand” is the courageous story about one woman’s quest to help two elephant land mine survivors walk again. I hope it speaks to animal lovers, humanitarians, and environmentalists, as well as the general public, but it is a story and a conversation-starter.

Thank you for starting this conversation about how Asian elephants are treated in the U.S. and I hope we can all work together to improve their lives, no matter where the Asian elephants live.

Sincerely,

Windy Borman

Director/Producer, “The Eyes of Thailand”

“The Eyes of Thailand” Heads South to the Little Rock Film Festival

Thursday, May 17th, 2012

“The Eyes of Thailand” is heading south for the Little Rock Film Festival. The Arkansas premiere of the documentary is May 30, 2012 at 4:30pm at the Little Rock Zoo.  Join Director/Producer Windy Borman for a pre-screening elephant talk and a post-screening filmmaker Q&A. The encore screening is June 1, 2012 at 12:45pm.

For information and to reserve tickets, visit http://tinyurl.com/EyesofThailandatLRFF

The Elephants in the Press-room: World Premiere Press Quotes

Friday, May 4th, 2012

You’ve heard the expression “the elephant in the room”. Well, we’re happy to share that people can’t help but talk about “the elephants in the PRESS-room”.

The buzz around “The Eyes of Thailand” world premiere has been amazing! Below are some sound bytes from the press:

‘The Eyes of Thailand’ is both tragic and triumphant, tied up with a message of hope that the best will prevail. - OC Social Scene

I laughed, I awwwed, I cried and was very moved… Windy Borman and company proved to me that good movies can be American made. - Fierce and Nerdy

‘The Eyes of Thailand’ means to open viewers’ eyes to the plights of these elephants, as they parallel those of human land mine victims… [The film] illustrates [Soraida] Salwala’s dedication, her insistence that elephants not be forgotten. - PopMatters

‘The best documentaries are the ones that can get to the heart of a larger issue by focusing in on a specific case… Borman’s film captures the trials and triumphs of Salwala and the elephants, Mosha and Motala, while also raising awareness about how landmines are still being used.’ – FilmSlate Magazine

World’s largest landmine survivors walk again with human help and ingenuity. “Eyes of Thailand” concentrates on an absolutely voiceless constituency—elephants—and the heroic efforts of Soraida Salwala… The video… [is] an emotional tripwire. – TakePart.com

This documentary tells a story about love, compassion and wondrous deeds of dedicated people, and skillfully enlightens the viewer about the cruelty and vast use of land mines — not just in Thailand and Burma but throughout the world. – GrandMagazine.com

Soraida is a warm, big-hearted and passionate muse, kind of like a Mother Therese for the elephants. Her caring is charismatic as it is compelling. – LA Splash

Additionally, both Director/Producer Windy Borman and Producer Tim VandeSteeg were interviewed by OC Films on the red carpet (above). You can watch the video stream via LiveStream. [Note: It's currently the 2nd video down in the library].

Windy also appeared in IndieWire’s Women and Hollywood in April. You can read the full article here.

We know our publicist has more up his sleeve, and we’ll post them to our Facebook page and Twitter account as they come in. Stay tuned!

You can also help us spread the “buzz” by adding web banners, images or the trailer to your website via the film’s Pressroom. Check it out!